The Rise and Risk of IoT Devices in the Workplace

The internet of things (IoT) is a broad term used to describe the network of devices that connect to any particular wireless internet. For example, anything that has “smart” as a prefix is almost guaranteed to need an internet connection, making it an IoT device.

The IoT has grown to a vast number of devices since the beginning of 2010. Many modern homes have a few devices that connect to the internet, be it a voice speaker like Google Home or a streaming device like the Amazon Fire Stick. Contemporary innovations have brought society incredible new tech, such as remote-start coffee makers and thermostats, refrigerators with dietary suggestions, and even door locks that can only unlock with your phone. It’s predicted that nearly 31 billion IoT–connected devices will be online by 2020.

IoT devices are beginning to make their way into corporate spaces as well. Some offices may have an Amazon Echo for conference calls or a streaming device to share the screen of a laptop with a nearby TV.

What you may not understand is that anything connected to the internet is vulnerable to a multitude of cyber attacks.

The rapid rate of tech advancement and mass adoption has made society comfortable connecting their internet to just about anything. Securing those devices can be tough, and while cybersecurity is constantly improving in these devices, nothing has stopped hackers from finding a way in yet. Blind faith that those devices are keeping your data safe is not smart. Research from Ponemon Institute found that 97% of risk management professionals indicated an IoT data breach as catastrophic for an organization.

Some IoT recent IoT attacks include:

August 2016 – Mirai botnet attack — Targeted IoT recording devices creating one of the largest DDoS attacks in history

August 2017 – An macabre attack on IoT pacemakers lead to a recall of 500,000 devices fearing a security gap that would allow an attacker to manipulate the device.

All companies should adopt a set of security practices, rules, or regulations to keep employees aware and accountable. Make sure that you check with IT to be sure the device is safe for a corporate network. Our partner Fortinet provides full network visibility, monitoring anything and everything connected to a network, specifically, the ability to control those devices with a dynamic, automated response.

From their website “FortiNAC simplifies the deployment of IoT devices by automating most of the authentication process using a sponsor. When a new IoT device tries to connect to the network, FortiNAC automatically places the device in an isolated network, profiles the device, and sends the information and the suspected type of device to the appropriate department for review and authorization. Once the device is confirmed, FortiNAC notifies the firewall of the type of device and where to place it in the correct network segment. The solution is also easy to upgrade and scale across organizations of all sizes and industries.” Check out their comprehensive guide to securing your IoT network here.

It’s important to step back and remember that we are only in the beginning phase of the IoT device. In the near future, most of the devices we use, including microwaves, fire alarms, and cars will be connected to the web, meaning there is always a chance of cyber attack. Being proactive about your IoT security could halt a much larger breach in its tracks. If you’re concerned about the use of IoT devices in your office, give us a call for a free consultation. We proudly deliver FortiNAC solutions as a Fortinet partner and would be happy to explain exactly how we would secure all your devices, now and in the future.

Sources:

https://www.csoonline.com/article/3244467/internet-of-things/2018-prediction-securing-iot-connected-devices-will-be-a-major-cybersecurity-challenge.html

https://www.fortinet.com/content/dam/fortinet/assets/solution-guides/SB-FortiNAC-simplifies-IOT-security.pdf

 

The internet of things (IoT) is a broad term used to describe the network of devices that connect to any particular wireless internet. For example, anything that has “smart” as a prefix is almost guaranteed to need an internet connection, making it an IoT device.

The IoT has grown to a vast number of devices since the beginning of 2010. Many modern homes have a few devices that connect to the internet, be it a voice speaker like Google Home or a streaming device like the Amazon Fire Stick. Contemporary innovations have brought society incredible new tech, such as remote-start coffee makers and thermostats, refrigerators with dietary suggestions, and even door locks that can only unlock with your phone. It’s predicted that nearly 31 billion IoT–connected devices will be online by 2020.

IoT devices are beginning to make their way into corporate spaces as well. Some offices may have an Amazon Echo for conference calls or a streaming device to share the screen of a laptop with a nearby TV.

What you may not understand is that anything connected to the internet is vulnerable to a multitude of cyber attacks.

The rapid rate of tech advancement and mass adoption has made society comfortable connecting their internet to just about anything. Securing those devices can be tough, and while cybersecurity is constantly improving in these devices, nothing has stopped hackers from finding a way in yet. Blind faith that those devices are keeping your data safe is not smart. Research from Ponemon Institute found that 97% of risk management professionals indicated an IoT data breach as catastrophic for an organization.

Some IoT recent IoT attacks include:

August 2016 – Mirai botnet attack — Targeted IoT recording devices creating one of the largest DDoS attacks in history

August 2017 – An macabre attack on IoT pacemakers lead to a recall of 500,000 devices fearing a security gap that would allow an attacker to manipulate the device.

All companies should adopt a set of security practices, rules, or regulations to keep employees aware and accountable. Make sure that you check with IT to be sure the device is safe for a corporate network. Our partner Fortinet provides full network visibility, monitoring anything and everything connected to a network, specifically, the ability to control those devices with a dynamic, automated response.

From their website “FortiNAC simplifies the deployment of IoT devices by automating most of the authentication process using a sponsor. When a new IoT device tries to connect to the network, FortiNAC automatically places the device in an isolated network, profiles the device, and sends the information and the suspected type of device to the appropriate department for review and authorization. Once the device is confirmed, FortiNAC notifies the firewall of the type of device and where to place it in the correct network segment. The solution is also easy to upgrade and scale across organizations of all sizes and industries.” Check out their comprehensive guide to securing your IoT network here.

It’s important to step back and remember that we are only in the beginning phase of the IoT device. In the near future, most of the devices we use, including microwaves, fire alarms, and cars will be connected to the web, meaning there is always a chance of cyber attack. Being proactive about your IoT security could halt a much larger breach in its tracks. If you’re concerned about the use of IoT devices in your office, give us a call for a free consultation. We proudly deliver FortiNAC solutions as a Fortinet partner and would be happy to explain exactly how we would secure all your devices, now and in the future.

Sources:

https://www.csoonline.com/article/3244467/internet-of-things/2018-prediction-securing-iot-connected-devices-will-be-a-major-cybersecurity-challenge.html

https://www.fortinet.com/content/dam/fortinet/assets/solution-guides/SB-FortiNAC-simplifies-IOT-security.pdf

 

Protecting Your Law Firm in 2019: Part 1

From Equifax to The Panama Papers, recent history has seen its fair share of cybersecurity blunders. Breaches of well-known companies have proven that even largest and most secure corporations are susceptible to cyber attacks. And if you’re thinking that you may be too small to attack, think again — Ransomware is projected to attack a business every 14 seconds by the end of 2019, up from every 40 seconds this year.

It’s no surprise that law firms have a target on their back when it comes to hacking. Legal firms often deal with highly sensitive information and larger quantities of capital – any hackers dream. Lax security measures and the use of Internet of Things (IoT) devices, many of which lack proper protection, creates unknown vulnerabilities that could result in a digital disaster.

With legal client relationships based on confidentiality, even one publicised mishap can ruin a reputation. Today’s virtual workplace and the growing amount of digital tools servicing the legal industry make it more important than ever to have a contemporary and updated cybersecurity front. In this post, we’ll introduce you to the top three attacks you may face in 2019, then in part two, we’ll teach you exactly what you can do to avoid them.

 

1. Phishing

A Phishing scam is an act of using a fake notification, such as an email, to acquire important credentials from a victim. The notification is often disguised as a normal email, using brand logos and a URL that appears familiar. Leveraging the assumed trust, the scammer will ask for private information in order to fix an issue. With the unsavvy victim confused and vulnerable, they will usually forfeit their information, allowing the thief to easily access their accounts.  On average, 12-30% of people click on phishing messages and are the most common issues in cybersecurity.

 

2. Ransomware Infections:

Ransomware is exactly what it sounds like — a hacker will use a specific software to hold your information or accounts hostage until you can produce a required ransom. Unlike phishing, the information is seldom “taken” from the organization, rather it is obstructed from being accessed or used.

Ransomware can be especially dangerous depending on the infrastructure of an enterprise — while some can lock employees out of their email, others can shut down the entire website or operating system the company relies on.

According to Verizon’s 2018 Data Breach Investigations Report, organizations need to be on high alert for ransomware attacks. The most common causes of a ransomware breach are employee tricked into downloading a disguised file, visiting a compromised website that hides malicious code, a user opens a malicious email attachment, or a user clicks on a malicious link within an email message.

 

3. Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDoS) Attacks.

NETSCOUT Arbor revealed there were seven times more distributed denial (DDoS) attacks… observed during the first six months of 2018 compared to the first half of 2017. In this cyber attack, the perpetrator wants to make a computer or network unavailable. With the denial of service attacks (DoS), cybercriminals flood your site with an extortionate amount of traffic, either rendering it unusable or causing the system to crash.

By overloading a law firm’s internet server, criminals temporarily disrupt the firm’s ability to conduct business. The attack gives the perpetrator leverage for a number of malicious reasons, including holding the site at ransom. For firms relying on IoT services, DoS attacks are a very serious matter, as they can spread like a virus and cause invaluable lose of time and resources. They can also be the first sign of a larger, more complex attack. For this reason, monitoring your traffic to prevent a DoS attack should be at the top of your cybersecurity priorities.

Stay Tuned!

In our next blog, we’ll discuss various methods you can begin to implement for enhanced cyber safety and security.

From Equifax to The Panama Papers, recent history has seen its fair share of cybersecurity blunders. Breaches of well-known companies have proven that even largest and most secure corporations are susceptible to cyber attacks. And if you’re thinking that you may be too small to attack, think again — Ransomware is projected to attack a business every 14 seconds by the end of 2019, up from every 40 seconds this year.

It’s no surprise that law firms have a target on their back when it comes to hacking. Legal firms often deal with highly sensitive information and larger quantities of capital – any hackers dream. Lax security measures and the use of Internet of Things (IoT) devices, many of which lack proper protection, creates unknown vulnerabilities that could result in a digital disaster.

With legal client relationships based on confidentiality, even one publicised mishap can ruin a reputation. Today’s virtual workplace and the growing amount of digital tools servicing the legal industry make it more important than ever to have a contemporary and updated cybersecurity front. In this post, we’ll introduce you to the top three attacks you may face in 2019, then in part two, we’ll teach you exactly what you can do to avoid them.

 

1. Phishing

A Phishing scam is an act of using a fake notification, such as an email, to acquire important credentials from a victim. The notification is often disguised as a normal email, using brand logos and a URL that appears familiar. Leveraging the assumed trust, the scammer will ask for private information in order to fix an issue. With the unsavvy victim confused and vulnerable, they will usually forfeit their information, allowing the thief to easily access their accounts.  On average, 12-30% of people click on phishing messages and are the most common issues in cybersecurity.

 

2. Ransomware Infections:

Ransomware is exactly what it sounds like — a hacker will use a specific software to hold your information or accounts hostage until you can produce a required ransom. Unlike phishing, the information is seldom “taken” from the organization, rather it is obstructed from being accessed or used.

Ransomware can be especially dangerous depending on the infrastructure of an enterprise — while some can lock employees out of their email, others can shut down the entire website or operating system the company relies on.

According to Verizon’s 2018 Data Breach Investigations Report, organizations need to be on high alert for ransomware attacks. The most common causes of a ransomware breach are employee tricked into downloading a disguised file, visiting a compromised website that hides malicious code, a user opens a malicious email attachment, or a user clicks on a malicious link within an email message.

 

3. Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDoS) Attacks.

NETSCOUT Arbor revealed there were seven times more distributed denial (DDoS) attacks… observed during the first six months of 2018 compared to the first half of 2017. In this cyber attack, the perpetrator wants to make a computer or network unavailable. With the denial of service attacks (DoS), cybercriminals flood your site with an extortionate amount of traffic, either rendering it unusable or causing the system to crash.

By overloading a law firm’s internet server, criminals temporarily disrupt the firm’s ability to conduct business. The attack gives the perpetrator leverage for a number of malicious reasons, including holding the site at ransom. For firms relying on IoT services, DoS attacks are a very serious matter, as they can spread like a virus and cause invaluable lose of time and resources. They can also be the first sign of a larger, more complex attack. For this reason, monitoring your traffic to prevent a DoS attack should be at the top of your cybersecurity priorities.

Stay Tuned!

In our next blog, we’ll discuss various methods you can begin to implement for enhanced cyber safety and security.

Failing the Phish Test

Phish testing your employees is a vital part of any security awareness program.  It seems logical that by exposing employees to phishing and helping them identify tactics, the chance of anyone in your organization to be phished lessens.  But does it?

When employees who failed phish tests are called out, made to feel poorly or singled out in a group the exact opposite can happen.

End users are the largest, most vulnerable target in most organizations. In real-world attacks, end users are relentlessly bombarded with spear-phishing and socially engineered schemes.

As the champion of your organizations cyber security, it is imperative that these tests be used as teachable moments to educate and encourage your end users.

Use Failure as a Teachable Moment.

Look at the failure of phish testing in a different light: you’ve identified a weakness in your security that can now be remedied.

Effective Phish Testing Checklist

Every phish test should follow some basic tenets in order to educate users:

  1. The links in a phish test campaign should go directly to a site with immediate education.
  2. Do not call out or embarrass users who fail the test.  Public shaming results in decreased threat reporting.
  3. Do not tie user responses to employee evaluation testing.  Doing so can can create resentment towards security, which is not good for the organization.
  4. Offer encouragement and education by directing users to additional training.  This can be optional or required depending on how many times the user has failed.
  5. Provide additional written materials such as articles and information from other sources.
  6. Reward people who report incidents.  This can be as simple as a kudo’s in the company newsletter or even prizes and contests.  Make sure that your organizations culture gives positive support to employees who report incidents.

Protecting Your Network 

JDL Group can help you put in place the right cyber security measures for you and your organization. If you want to learn more about protecting yourself and your employees from phishing campaigns check out our free anti-phishing toolkit.  

References: 

https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/next-gen-infosec/reward-flag-phish-highlight-failed/

https://www.sophos.com/en-us/products/phish-threat.aspx

 

Phish testing your employees is a vital part of any security awareness program.  It seems logical that by exposing employees to phishing and helping them identify tactics, the chance of anyone in your organization to be phished lessens.  But does it?

When employees who failed phish tests are called out, made to feel poorly or singled out in a group the exact opposite can happen.

End users are the largest, most vulnerable target in most organizations. In real-world attacks, end users are relentlessly bombarded with spear-phishing and socially engineered schemes.

As the champion of your organizations cyber security, it is imperative that these tests be used as teachable moments to educate and encourage your end users.

Use Failure as a Teachable Moment.

Look at the failure of phish testing in a different light: you’ve identified a weakness in your security that can now be remedied.

Effective Phish Testing Checklist

Every phish test should follow some basic tenets in order to educate users:

  1. The links in a phish test campaign should go directly to a site with immediate education.
  2. Do not call out or embarrass users who fail the test.  Public shaming results in decreased threat reporting.
  3. Do not tie user responses to employee evaluation testing.  Doing so can can create resentment towards security, which is not good for the organization.
  4. Offer encouragement and education by directing users to additional training.  This can be optional or required depending on how many times the user has failed.
  5. Provide additional written materials such as articles and information from other sources.
  6. Reward people who report incidents.  This can be as simple as a kudo’s in the company newsletter or even prizes and contests.  Make sure that your organizations culture gives positive support to employees who report incidents.

Protecting Your Network 

JDL Group can help you put in place the right cyber security measures for you and your organization. If you want to learn more about protecting yourself and your employees from phishing campaigns check out our free anti-phishing toolkit.  

References: 

https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/next-gen-infosec/reward-flag-phish-highlight-failed/

https://www.sophos.com/en-us/products/phish-threat.aspx

 

How to Reduce Your Law Firm’s Cyber Risk

law firm cyber security

Experts agree that cybersecurity threats present significant risks to businesses, including law firms. Clients place a great deal of trust in law firms, which have a clear duty to protect their clients’ sensitive information. While bigger targets exist, hackers have begun targeting law firms because they found them to be the weakest link.

Law firms usually have relatively weak or non-existent cyber-defense systems or protocols in place. Fortunately, mitigating risks from data breaches or ransomware requires a small number of relatively simple measures. Here are some cybersecurity best practices any law firm can put in place.

1. Use Multi-Factor Authentication

Also known as two-factor authentication, this simple procedure makes use of a user password and something else the user has (e.g., token, app, device, etc.) to generate a second temporary password or code to login to an information system. It may seem cumbersome to require a password plus a second step, but it is the easiest procedure a law firm can implement to significantly improve security.

2. Never Share Logins or Passwords

Password sharing remains a common practice, even in businesses. Employees do this all the time, often just to give a coworker access to a program or to simplify login procedures from a remote location. In some cases, passwords can be found on notes sitting on employee desks or sticking to monitors.

Reusing accounts presents a similar risk. In this instance, employees continue to use the account of a departed employee to maintain access to a specific profile or to data that profile can access.

Law firms should eliminate password and login sharing, requiring their IT department to create new logins for incoming employees and delete old accounts.

3. Choose Better Passwords

law firm cyber security Passwords constitute the first, and sometimes only, line of defense against cyber-attacks. Hackers today use improved technology to crack passwords, ending the days when an employee could use the same simple password forever.

Law firms should require passwords that are longer, use more diverse characters, and are changed regularly. A good password consists of at least eight characters, a mix of letters, numbers, and special characters, a limitation on repeat characters (e.g., BB).

Each system should have a unique password, and law firm employees should be encouraged to vary passwords on different websites they access. Another good practice is to use an extremely complicated password for email accounts, which is needed to reset passwords. Password managers also exist to help manage many different accounts.

4. Update Systems

Installing updates, while often frustrating, protects an operating system from vulnerabilities. Upgrading the operating system to the current version (e.g., Windows 10 or Sierra) provides extra protection.

5. Encryption

This uses a formula to make data unreadable without a key. As long as the key is secure, the data remains safe. Several services exist that provide encryption, and the latest computers have encryption that simply needs to be enabled.

These steps are relatively easy to set up, but transform a firm’s cybersecurity. Law firms face risks like every other business. By enacting industry best practices, a law firm reduces the dangers of an attack and gives their clients the security they expect.

Contact Us

JDL Group can help your law firm adopt the right cyber security strategy. Contact us today.

Additional Resources:
http://www.onelegal.com/blog/5-steps-to-getting-serious-about-law-firm-cyber-security/
http://www.lawtechnologytoday.org/2017/02/tips-for-risk-mitigation/
http://www.lawtechnologytoday.org/2017/01/why-remote-security-is-a-must/
https://blog.lexicata.com/how-to-improve-data-security-at-your-law-firm/

ransomware attacks on law firms

law firm cyber security

Experts agree that cybersecurity threats present significant risks to businesses, including law firms. Clients place a great deal of trust in law firms, which have a clear duty to protect their clients’ sensitive information. While bigger targets exist, hackers have begun targeting law firms because they found them to be the weakest link.

Law firms usually have relatively weak or non-existent cyber-defense systems or protocols in place. Fortunately, mitigating risks from data breaches or ransomware requires a small number of relatively simple measures. Here are some cybersecurity best practices any law firm can put in place.

1. Use Multi-Factor Authentication

Also known as two-factor authentication, this simple procedure makes use of a user password and something else the user has (e.g., token, app, device, etc.) to generate a second temporary password or code to login to an information system. It may seem cumbersome to require a password plus a second step, but it is the easiest procedure a law firm can implement to significantly improve security.

2. Never Share Logins or Passwords

Password sharing remains a common practice, even in businesses. Employees do this all the time, often just to give a coworker access to a program or to simplify login procedures from a remote location. In some cases, passwords can be found on notes sitting on employee desks or sticking to monitors.

Reusing accounts presents a similar risk. In this instance, employees continue to use the account of a departed employee to maintain access to a specific profile or to data that profile can access.

Law firms should eliminate password and login sharing, requiring their IT department to create new logins for incoming employees and delete old accounts.

3. Choose Better Passwords

law firm cyber security Passwords constitute the first, and sometimes only, line of defense against cyber-attacks. Hackers today use improved technology to crack passwords, ending the days when an employee could use the same simple password forever.

Law firms should require passwords that are longer, use more diverse characters, and are changed regularly. A good password consists of at least eight characters, a mix of letters, numbers, and special characters, a limitation on repeat characters (e.g., BB).

Each system should have a unique password, and law firm employees should be encouraged to vary passwords on different websites they access. Another good practice is to use an extremely complicated password for email accounts, which is needed to reset passwords. Password managers also exist to help manage many different accounts.

4. Update Systems

Installing updates, while often frustrating, protects an operating system from vulnerabilities. Upgrading the operating system to the current version (e.g., Windows 10 or Sierra) provides extra protection.

5. Encryption

This uses a formula to make data unreadable without a key. As long as the key is secure, the data remains safe. Several services exist that provide encryption, and the latest computers have encryption that simply needs to be enabled.

These steps are relatively easy to set up, but transform a firm’s cybersecurity. Law firms face risks like every other business. By enacting industry best practices, a law firm reduces the dangers of an attack and gives their clients the security they expect.

Contact Us

JDL Group can help your law firm adopt the right cyber security strategy. Contact us today.

Additional Resources:
http://www.onelegal.com/blog/5-steps-to-getting-serious-about-law-firm-cyber-security/
http://www.lawtechnologytoday.org/2017/02/tips-for-risk-mitigation/
http://www.lawtechnologytoday.org/2017/01/why-remote-security-is-a-must/
https://blog.lexicata.com/how-to-improve-data-security-at-your-law-firm/

ransomware attacks on law firms

Your Business Should Be in the Headlines for the Right Reasons, Not for a Cyber Attack

cyber security NJ Law Firm Cyber Security NYC

Today’s headlines are peppered with stories of major companies and institutions falling victim to a cyberattack. As a business owner, what’s your response to these gut-wrenching stories? If you write them off as fear mongering and believe that these attacks can never happen to your SMB, well, you’re wrong. They can and it’s up to you to prevent such a disaster.

One reason why it’s so important to shore up your company’s network security is because the ramifications of a breach extend well beyond the sensationalism surrounding a news story. Take for example one of the biggest stories of hacking in recent memory; the revelation made public last December that Yahoo had more than one billion of its accounts compromised, dating all the way back to 2013. While the headlines focused on the plight of Yahoo and the negative effect this would have on the tech company’s value, what didn’t get reported is how millions of Yahoo users were negatively affected by having their sensitive information exposed to hackers.

In the same way, seeing to your company’s network security goes beyond protecting your corporate image from a negative headline. It’s also about protecting all of those who have entrusted you with their sensitive data. This includes customers and vendors that have provided your business with their financial information, as well as employees that each have a wealth of their personal information connected to your HR department.

We’ve established that there’s a lot riding on your network security and that it’s your job to make sure this is taken care of. If you don’t currently have a security plan in place protecting your company from a data breach, where do you even begin? Fortunately, you don’t need to be an IT security expert or have a computer science degree to implement adequate security measures. As is the case with the many vital responsibilities connected to your business, you can outsource the protection of your network to the professionals, such as the IT technicians at JDL Group.

That said, IT security is such an important and comprehensive matter that it’s not something that you should outsource and then disregard. In fact, IT security works best when everybody in the company understands that they have an active role in its upkeep. Yes, everybody. We’re talking from the C-level executives down to the cleaning lady who connects her smartphone to Wi-Fi. If everyone in your company understands how to avoid the snares laid by hackers, then the cake that is your network security measures will be topped with the icing of best practices.

Remember, securing your network from cyberattacks isn’t something that you have to do on your own. JDL Group is here to help, and we can do so by implementing proven and comprehensive network security solutions like our Unified Threat Management tool, as well as remote monitoring and maintenance in order to detect and take care of any threats that may breach your defenses. We’re also available to equip your staff with the means and know-how to better understand cybersecurity.

Contact Us

For assistance in all of these areas of security and more, give us a call today at 973.607.2140.

cyber security NJ Law Firm Cyber Security NYC

Today’s headlines are peppered with stories of major companies and institutions falling victim to a cyberattack. As a business owner, what’s your response to these gut-wrenching stories? If you write them off as fear mongering and believe that these attacks can never happen to your SMB, well, you’re wrong. They can and it’s up to you to prevent such a disaster.

One reason why it’s so important to shore up your company’s network security is because the ramifications of a breach extend well beyond the sensationalism surrounding a news story. Take for example one of the biggest stories of hacking in recent memory; the revelation made public last December that Yahoo had more than one billion of its accounts compromised, dating all the way back to 2013. While the headlines focused on the plight of Yahoo and the negative effect this would have on the tech company’s value, what didn’t get reported is how millions of Yahoo users were negatively affected by having their sensitive information exposed to hackers.

In the same way, seeing to your company’s network security goes beyond protecting your corporate image from a negative headline. It’s also about protecting all of those who have entrusted you with their sensitive data. This includes customers and vendors that have provided your business with their financial information, as well as employees that each have a wealth of their personal information connected to your HR department.

We’ve established that there’s a lot riding on your network security and that it’s your job to make sure this is taken care of. If you don’t currently have a security plan in place protecting your company from a data breach, where do you even begin? Fortunately, you don’t need to be an IT security expert or have a computer science degree to implement adequate security measures. As is the case with the many vital responsibilities connected to your business, you can outsource the protection of your network to the professionals, such as the IT technicians at JDL Group.

That said, IT security is such an important and comprehensive matter that it’s not something that you should outsource and then disregard. In fact, IT security works best when everybody in the company understands that they have an active role in its upkeep. Yes, everybody. We’re talking from the C-level executives down to the cleaning lady who connects her smartphone to Wi-Fi. If everyone in your company understands how to avoid the snares laid by hackers, then the cake that is your network security measures will be topped with the icing of best practices.

Remember, securing your network from cyberattacks isn’t something that you have to do on your own. JDL Group is here to help, and we can do so by implementing proven and comprehensive network security solutions like our Unified Threat Management tool, as well as remote monitoring and maintenance in order to detect and take care of any threats that may breach your defenses. We’re also available to equip your staff with the means and know-how to better understand cybersecurity.

Contact Us

For assistance in all of these areas of security and more, give us a call today at 973.607.2140.